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Class teaches healthy living for chronic diseases – Standard

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scottw@standard-democrat.com

SIKESTON — Healthy living means fewer trips to the hospital — especially if you are living with a chronic disease.

About a half dozen people recently completed this area’s first Living a Healthy Life Workshop, a six-week course offered at Missouri Delta Medical Center through a partnership with local health departments to teach those with chronic conditions how to live so they spend less time in the hospital.

“The health department has amazing programs for the community but they were limited on places to have the programs and in being able to market them,” said Sharon Urhahn, director of marketing for MDMC. “So we’ve joined forces and it’s been a great partnership so far. This is just one of the programs we are working together on.”

“We meet once a week for two hours,” said an instructor who taught the just-completed course, Becky Kuykendall, a registered and licensed dietician-nutritionist for the Mississippi County Health Department.

Workshops were held from 10 a.m. till noon for the course that just finished but the time will be moved for each six-week course held at Missouri Delta Medical Center to make it accessible for more people, Urhahn said.

The workshop follows the Chronic Disease Self Management Program, or CDSMP, developed by Stanford University, according to Kuykendall.

“We try to give them the skills to self manage and be an active self manager of their disease,” Kuykendall said.

For the complete article and more local news stories, see an upcoming edition of the Standard Democrat. For the electronic edition click here to log on.

Article source: http://www.standard-democrat.com/story/2133018.html

CHC to conduct ‘aggressive’ campaign on healthy living


CHC to conduct ‘aggressive’ campaign on healthy living

Published on Friday, October 31, 2014 00:00

By Richelle Agpoon-Cabang – richelle@mvariety.com – Variety News Staff

TO help encourage the community to practice healthy lifestyles, the Commonwealth Healthcare Corp. will conduct an information campaign, CHCC Chief Executive Officer Esther Muna told Variety.

“Diabetes and heart diseases are the top diseases treated here and we want to address that,” CHCC Medical Director John Doyle Doyle said.

Muna said the hospital has been dealing with a very sick population, and diseases caused by lifestyle choices tend to be passed on in the family.

Muna said CHCC staff will step up their campaign by further educating the community about these diseases.

“We will be directly communicating with the community, starting from the elementary school level and moving up,” Doyle said.

They will collaborate with public schools and start with the children, he added.

“There are things going on here that we need to address,” he said. “For instance, we bring a patient to a hospital who is near death and use all our resources to save the patient. So the patient is saved and the family is happy. But it brings tears to your eyes to see the same patient lying in the hospital bed after a few weeks due to a stroke because he stopped taking his medication and did not do what he was advised to do” he said.

Muna said the hospital is working on a plan to construct a wellness center which will host interactive educational activities such as cooking classes.

Although CHCC has yet to offer more information about this plan, Muna said they have already started an “aggressive” campaign against disease prevention.

“You are predisposed to this condition. What are you going to do to avoid it? Stay away from triggers,” Doyle said.


View the discussion thread.

Article source: http://www.mvariety.com/cnmi/cnmi-news/local/70629-chc-to-conduct-aggressive-campaign-on-healthy-living

La Crosse County looking for ‘healthy living heroes’


LA CROSSE, Wis. (WKBT) –

Have you worked to make La Crosse County a healthier place to live, work and play?

The La Crosse County Healthy Living Collaboration wants to recognize local residents who have made it easier to be physically active, eat healthy and/or be tobacco free in the County.

There are three award categories for the 2015 Healthy Living Hero awards: youth (age 18 and under), individual and organization.

The La Crosse County Health Department said, “The types of activities that may be suitable to nominate include: working within an organization to set an example of leading a healthy life; supporting a policy that encourages and rewards others for adopting health policies and behaviors; or coordinating an activity that makes it easier for a group to choose healthy behaviors. This can be done in a formal way or informal way; if you think the activity is worth rewarding, please nominate the individual or organization.”

This is the second year of the awards. In 2014, Mayo Clinic Health System, old Oak Family Farm and Onalaska School District Garden Coordinator Jodie Visker received Healthy Living Hero awards.

For more information and to get an application for the 2015 Healthy Living Collaboration, contact Paula Silha at psilha@lacrossecounty.org.

Article source: http://www.news8000.com/health/La-Crosse-County-looking-for-healthy-living-heroes/29440244

Craving Comfort Food? Try These 3 Tips for Creating Healthy, Raw Comfort Food!

The weather is chilly, and the fireplace calls you to enjoy a cozy and filling meal right in front of it. Yes, the fall season is upon us! Fall is the perfect time of year to create new raw comfort foods that can be enjoyed on those cold yet beautiful days, where all you want to do is cuddle up on the couch and throw a movie on the screen.

And raw comfort foods are a great way to introduce friends and family to the raw food lifestyle when the weather tends to stand against such a notion. After all, most people think of nothing more than a bowl of salad and a wedge of watermelon when they think of the raw food lifestyle.

While fresh fruits and veggies are certainly a staple of a raw food, there is always room for a little comfort food. Here are a few tips and tricks you can use to make your raw comfort foods shine this fall season and beyond:

1. Make Your Next Lasagna Luscious

Lasagna is filling, tasty, and comforting which are all the things that most people look for in a delicious fall meal. There are a myriad of lasagna recipes out there, but most of them tend to feature the same things—zucchini noodles, tomato sauce, and usually some kind of nut-based cheese sauce. This is a great start, but here is how you can really kick up your lasagna’s comfort factor:

  • Make lasagna noodles out of butternut squash instead of or in addition to zucchini.
  • Marinade portobella mushrooms slices and layer them between your noodles.
  • Add a layer of basil and pumpkin seed pesto to the top of the dish.

These easy additions will take your next lasagna meal from great to spectacular. You can’t overdo it here, so try them all at once if you dare!

2. Create the Perfect Comfort Casserole

Casseroles can be tricky to pull off, but the truth is that all you need is a really good base. You can chop or process cauliflower to make a rice casserole dish, spiralize squash or pumpkin to make a noodle casserole, or even dehydrate sweet potatoes for a classic potato casserole dish. Once you have your base down, use these ideas to spice things up:

  • Marinate your base in a little bit of olive oil and dried spices to make the noodles, rice, or potatoes niche and rich.
  • Make your casseroles hardier by adding sprouted legumes to them.
  • Juice celery and carrots to use as broth in your casseroles.

If you don’t have a dehydrator big enough to put your entire casserole dish in it, dehydrate some of the ingredients in your dish separately, like the base and tomatoes, before you put it all together for added texture and pleasure.

3. Soothe Those Chills with Some Soup

Fall, or any time of year when the weather is cool for that matter, is designed to be celebrated with soup! There are so many tasty options to consider when it comes to blending up raw versions of classic favorites. To kick things up a notch, try one or more of these ideas:

  • Add half a cup of coconut meat to green soups for added richness and a smoother texture.
  • Choose dense vegetables like broccoli and carrots whenever possible to ensure that your soup isn’t too watery.
  • Add a special taste and texture to soups with edible flowers.

And garlic cloves as well as sweet onions go a long way if you want to create a rich broth-like flavor.

Stocking your pantry with a variety of spices like cinnamon, cardamom, and nutmeg will help you transform your raw comfort foods into holiday specific fare and elegant desserts too.

With these tips, you’ll get the best of both worlds – raw food to give you energy and comfort food to satisfy your soul!

Image Source: Raw Zucchini Noodles with Tomato Basil Sauce and Portobello Meatless Balls

This content provided above is for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

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Health Watch: Halloween Safety Tips




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Every Thursday night we do our best to give you some good ideas you can use to promote good health and safety. Since this Friday is a big day for costumes, candy and crowds, one of Rapid City’s Finest gives us a few helpful Halloween safety tips in this week’s Health Watch.

Officer Jerrell Lewellen says, “Children are excited. Like you said, it comes around once a year.”

As many gear up for the trick or treaters, Rapid City Police want you to remember that although you should be festive, you should also be safe.

Lewellen says, “When drivers are going through congested areas such as a subdivision, be very alert that children may dart out in front of them. Some of the costumes they’re going to be wearing are dark colored. And basically take their time, be alert, and be prepared to stop.”

While drivers should continue to obey traffic laws with all the congestion Halloween night brings, parents and children should do the same.

Lewellen says, “We’re going to ask the children and parents if they’re escorting their children to use sidewalks and also to cross the street at intersections or marked crosswalks.”

But the safety shouldn’t stop on the streets, police urge parents to take a good look at their children’s treats once the kids are home.

Lewellen says, “Growing up, kids are always told don’t accept candy from strangers. This is one of those days where it’s acceptable, right? But we still want parents to go through the candy and make sure that there’s no problems with it. Anything suspicious they should discard it and throw it away.”

Article source: http://www.blackhillsfox.com/home/headlines/RCPD-provides-residents-with-Halloween-Safety-Tips--280999112.html

Zombie Health Symposium In Oakland Reveals Survival Tips For The Living And …

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OAKLAND (CBS SF) — Now that the World Series is over, you can focus on more important matters — like preparing for a zombie apocalypse.

In a Thursday event blending fantasy and reality, healthcare experts at Samuel Merrit University in Oakland led a discussion dedicated to undead healthcare at the first-ever Zombie Health Symposium.

The event included academic presentations on the distinct array of ailments and maladies of the underserved zombie population, according to a statement released by the university.

Presentations  include topics like “The Zombie Brain and Proper Neuro-Neutralization Techniques,” “Occupational Therapy for the Animated Dead,” and “Using Observational Gait Analysis Techniques to Improve Survivability.”

“The paucity of research on this traditionally underserved population is appalling,” said Dr. Gordon Giles, professor in the Department of Occupational Therapy. “We shall right this wrong for the living and dead.”

Although the Center for Disease and Control have been busy keeping an Ebola outbreak under wraps, they aren’t taking any risks with zombies. The government agency has a webpage dedicated to preparing for a zombie apocalypse with tips like, “Plan your evacuation route. When zombies are hungry they won’t stop until they get food (i.e., brains), which means you need to get out of town fast!”

Article source: http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2014/10/30/zombie-health-symposium-in-oakland-tackles-common-maladies-for-living-and-undead-ebola-cdc-centers-for-disease-control-halloween-world-series/

The Best Thing About Microsoft’s Health Tracker Is That It’s Cross-Platform

Microsoft's new Band works with its cross-platform tracking app Health.

Microsoft’s new Band works with its cross-platform tracking app Health. Microsoft

With Apple Health and Google Fit offering a centralized fitness and wellness-tracking platform for iOS and Android users, did anyone really expect Microsoft to sit quietly and leave its mobile OS lacking?

Of course not: Microsoft has been working on a health tracking platform of its own. It’s called Microsoft Health, and there’s a wearable called Microsoft Band to go along with it. Both are available starting today in Microsoft retail stores and online starting today for $200.

While Health and Fit are locked into their corresponding operating system silos, Microsoft hopes to ford digital and hardware divides by making Health and its hardware constituent the Microsoft Band cross-platform. This is a smart move for a company whose mobile OS still only retains a four percent marketshare in the U.S. By packing the wearable with a handful of unique features like UV monitoring and guided workouts, the device could attract health-focused folks who might not otherwise go for a Microsoft product, and thus introduce them to the company’s ecosystem just as the iPod did for Apple back in the early 2000′s (“If you like the features and quality of this product, why not get even more by switching to a Windows Phone device?”). It’s a long shot, but perhaps one of the best chances in years Microsoft has of luring people into its mobile world.

Microsoft Health functions as you’d expect. The service collects data from your smartwatch, smartphone, or activity tracker, and can help you monitor your sleep quality, which of your exercises burn the most calories, and how much recovery time your body needs after training. It uses this data to provide suggestions that can better help you meet your fitness goals. Health is cloud-based, with big names like MapMyFitness, MyFitnessPal, RunKeeper, and Jawbone Up on board as initial launch partners.

The Microsoft Band fitness tracker, the company’s inaugural device in this space, resembles the Samsung Gear Fit or Garmin Vivofit in that it features a slim, full-color touchscreen display. It tracks the usuals—steps, sleep quality, and calories burned—as well as performing 24-hour heart rate monitoring and GPS tracking. The Band tracker also delivers smartphone notifications to your wrist, so you can get email, text, phone call, and calendar alerts. For Windows Phone users, it offers access to Cortana. It also has timer and alarm features.

The band has two abilities that set it apart from existing activity trackers, at least for now: Through partner apps, it can offer guided workouts, which seems like an incredibly useful application for a wearable. It can calculate the current UV index when you’re outdoors, helping you discern whether or not you should be wearing sunscreen.

If you’re not already overcome by fitness-tracking fatigue, Microsoft’s offerings, while coming a little late to the game, do sound promising. The software side aims to be more than just a storage container of pretty graphs.

Article source: http://www.wired.com/2014/10/microsoft-health-band/

How Google’s latest moonshot could change human health

We know Google as a search company, and now as an email and social media company. But it sees itself as much more, and nowhere is that more evident than its secretive Google X laboratory. Its team there tackles “moonshots,” which can mean anything from delivery drones to glucose-monitoring contact lenses.

Monday saw the announcement of yet another unexpected project: health diagnostics. Google X has been working on nanoparticles that, after consumed, stream through the human body and pick up on signs of waning health — cancer cells, for example. The nanoparticles then congregate at a band worn on the wrist to report their findings.

It’s a bold goal that could suddenly move expensive, time-consuming and difficult tests from a hospital to anyone’s pocket. How exactly can Google, of all companies, do that?

What are nanoparticles? Are they really OK to eat?

Nanoparticles are what they sound like: teeny-tiny particles. They can take many forms, but Google starts with an iron oxide core, Google X lead Andrew Conrad told Medium. Iron oxide is magnetic, which means that magnets in the wristband can draw the nanoparticles together at the wearer’s wrist whenever it is time to record their findings. Google then coats the iron oxide cores with different materials depending on the application they are meant to pursue; one nanoparticle might seek out sodium, while another detects cancer cells.

The particles measure between 1 and 100 nanometers across. That’s smaller than the HIV virus but larger than a water molecule. Conrad described them to Medium as 2,000 times smaller than a red blood cell–easily small enough to travel anywhere in the body.

Google's explanation of how the nanoparticles work. Graphic by Google.

Google’s explanation of how the nanoparticles work. Graphic by Google.

That’s great for Google’s goals for the project because it means the particles can check out every corner of a person’s body. But it also opens up the potential for them to go places they maybe shouldn’t be, such as the lungs or the brain. The CDC notes that some types of nanoparticles have been shown to cause serious health proBLEMS, including inflammation and neurological problems.

But Google designed its nanoparticles specifically for human consumption. Most of the particles studied by the CDC were used for industrial purposes, and then accidentally inhaled. Conrad said at the WSJ.D Live conference Monday that after ingestion, Google’s particles would naturally pass out through the digestive tract. They can also be maneuvered in the body with magnets. Similar nanoparticles are already safely used for medical imaging.

Why is Google interested in diagnostics?

The nanoparticle bracelet is actually a complement to another project that Google X has been working on. Back in July, the division introduced its “Baseline Study,” which is meant to document exactly what it means to be a healthy individual. According to the original media release:

People tend to think of “health” and “illness” in a binary way, as two distinct states, because that’s often what it feels like when we’re the patient. It feels sudden—“I had a heart attack” or “I have cancer”. But in reality, our body’s chemistry moves gradually along a continuum from a state of health to a state of disease, and we only have observable symptoms when we’re already far along that continuum.

But long before those symptoms appear, the chemistry of the body has changed — its cells, or the molecules inside cells. Unfortunately, the medical profession today doesn’t understand at that molecular level what happens when a body starts to get sick. And that’s why doctors typically can only treat disease once there are symptoms. If we could somehow detect those changes earlier, as soon as a body starts to move away from a “healthy” chemistry, this could change how diseases are detected, treated, or even prevented.

The bracelet is that “somehow,” as it would allow people to monitor those chemistry changes in real time. If it works, Google could change how the western world tackles disease.

Google X lead Andrew Conrad. Photo by Google.

Google X lead Andrew Conrad. Photo by Google.

But Google is an internet company, right? What’s it doing in the health sector? Well, it knows from its search, email and other business lines that there is money in data. Health data is no different.

OK, sign me up

Google’s diagnostic bracelet isn’t quite here yet. Google X has stated it is “still in the early stages of scientific exploration,” but Conrad did tell Medium that the lab is far enough along to be confident it can make the system work:

At our Google facilities, we’ve been able to build the nanoparticles, decorate them, prove that they bind to the things that we want them to bind to, in really clever artificial systems. We’ve made these molded arms where we pump fake blood through them and then try devices to detect the nanoparticles. We’re pretty good at concentrating and detecting nanoparticles. We’re pretty good at making sure that those particles bind only to cancer cells and not to other cells.

If it works, health could suddenly become something very quantifiable. There would be no more (or, at least, fewer) vague descriptions to doctors about vague symptoms. Clear answers would be available at the earliest possible moment. Who doesn’t want that?

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Article source: https://gigaom.com/2014/10/30/how-googles-latest-moonshot-could-change-human-health/

Africa’s Top Health Challenge: Cardiovascular Disease

Standing in the lobby of the Sheraton Times Square Hotel at the Clinton Global Initiative’s 10th annual meeting, Kenyan physician Dr. Allan Pamba excitedly tells me about a new initiative to train African scientists in non-communicable disease (NCD) research. This $8.1 million NCD Open Lab is the brainchild of GlaxoSmithkline (GSK), where he is now vice president of pharmaceuticals for East Africa, but I first met him when he was an intern at a rural hospital in the foothills of Mount Kenya nearly 15 years ago. He explains to me that he now thinks of non-communicable diseases with the same urgency as he did infectious diseases back then.

Like Pamba, for as long as I can remember, working as a doctor in sub-Saharan Africa, the three big catchwords were: malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV/AIDS. These diseases ravaged the sub-continent and, rightfully so, received the most funding. But while donors have poured resources into fighting infectious diseases, non-communicable, chronic diseases have quietly but rapidly ascended the morbidity and mortality ladders, especially high blood pressure, or hypertension.

Today, cardiovascular disease is the number-one cause of death in sub-Saharan Africa in adults over the age of 30. Globally, low- and middle-income countries bear 80 percent of the world’s death burden from cardiovascular disease. One of the strongest drivers is undiagnosed and untreated hypertension, which affects nearly one in two Africans over the age of 25—the highest rate of any continent in the world.

But current funding spins a different narrative. In November 2010, a Center for Global development working paper on global development assistance for health (DAH) revealed that after controlling for burden of disease, 30 times more DAH money was allocated to malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV, compared to all NCDs combined. Astonished by these numbers, I called development economist Rachel Nugent, the lead author of that study, who is now director of the Disease Control Priorities Network, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Though Nugent has not officially updated the numbers since her 2007 calculations, she has insight into current trends, and says that assistance for NCDs is increasing, but slowly. Nugent agrees with Pamba that sub-Saharan African countries recognize that hypertension and cardiovascular disease are priorities, but the lack of funding is a major barrier. “Without a doubt the perception of what causes and who gets chronic disease is a barrier to donor investment,” Nugent says. “Donors don’t say it, but I am quite convinced that in the backs of the minds of those in wealthier countries is that NCDs are for rich, fat white men. It’s not something poor children and adults get—but that’s wrong. That perception that it’s people’s own fault and that you can’t change behavior may seem believable, but that doesn’t accord with the facts.”

As Nugent insinuated, hypertension in this population is not exclusively a lifestyle issue; studies have shown that sub-Saharan Africans may be genetically predisposed as well. One hypothesis is that certain African populations may be more vulnerable to salt retention, resulting in more drug-resistant hypertension that strikes at a younger age. This idea is not new. Pamba shares a personal story from his youth: “I’m from western Kenya. My father had hypertension. He came home one day with an article showing hypertension is increased in our population because of a certain gene. When I reflect on that now, it means someone was thinking about this all the way back in the 1980s!”

Dr. Marleen Hendriks, a researcher who successfully implemented hypertension treatment within a state health insurance program in rural Nigeria, also agrees that there is a common misconception that this is the disease of the rich when it actually devastates the poor far more as an unfortunate, inevitable side effect of economic growth and Westernization. Hendriks explains to me that in Africa, “Coca-Cola is everywhere and cheap, sometimes even cheaper than water. It’s the same for all these processed foods. You can buy cheap cookies at every corner, even in the most rural areas.”

Hendriks’s initial interest was sparked when she was a clinician in Amsterdam; she recalled seeing patients from Ghana with uncontrolled blood pressure and was struck by how much younger and sicker they were compared to their Dutch counterparts. She soon realized, “Treating hypertension is a whole different story than treating one malaria episode. If you want to treat chronic diseases, you need to strengthen the entire health system. It’s a test that your health system is functioning if you’re successful. And in general most African health systems are dysfunctional.”

* * *

One of the biggest challenges to properly treating hypertension is simply knowing that a patient has it. Currently, it remains undiagnosed in the majority of sub-Saharan Africa. For instance, less than 10 percent of those in rural Nigeria and Gabon with hypertension are even aware of it. This is particularly alarming given that the current healthcare systems of most sub-Saharan African countries are not able to provide emergency ambulance services or technological interventions like cardiac stents. If an African feels chest pain and has a heart attack, he or she will likely die, or have severe heart failure, which can quickly add up to heavy health and economic burdens. And, unlike in the U.S., where heart problems often occur at an older age, in Africa, they usually strike younger people in their prime who normally would provide for an entire household.

Article source: http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/10/africas-top-health-challenge-cardiovascular-disease/381699/

Group of 25 men beat killer diseases in 35-year experiment

  • The men in their 80s and 90s completed a pioneering 35-year health study 
  • They undertook regular exercise, did not smoke and ate well
  • Low alcohol intake and healthy bodyweight are key to being disease-free
  • The project of 2,500 men in South Wales is longest of its kind
  • It found those following steps were 60% less likely to develop dementia
  • There was a similar reduction in the risk of heart attacks and strokes

Jenny Hope for the Daily Mail

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A team of older men have celebrated completing a pioneering 35-year health study – beating killer diseases by making simple changes to their lifestyle.

Health experts told volunteers to follow five simple rules – eat well, work out, drink less, keep their weight down and never smoke.

They were told if they followed the healthy-living plan they would avoid heart disease, cancer, diabetes and dementia. 

Live long and prosper: A team of older men have celebrated completing a pioneering 35-year health study - beating killer diseases by making simple changes to their lifestyle

Live long and prosper: A team of older men have celebrated completing a pioneering 35-year health study – beating killer diseases by making simple changes to their lifestyle

Leighton Jones, 80, who still cycles.  A group of men from Caerphilly in South Wales celebrated completing a pioneering 35-year health study - beating killer diseases by making simple changes to their lifestyle. More than 2,500 men agreed to be monitored for the rest of their life - but only 25 of them managed to stick to the rules they were given in 1979- eat well, work out, drink less, keep their weight down and never smoke.Pictured here is Leighton Jones age 80 who still cycles© WALES NEWS SERVICE

Leighton Jones, 80, who still cycles frequently. Right, the retired teacher when he first started the study

More than 2,500 men agreed to be monitored for the rest of their lives – but only 25 managed to stick to the rules they were given in 1979.

The ‘survivors’ are now in their eighties and nineties and yesterday celebrated their long lives at a party held by the research team.

The study in South Wales is the longest of its kind to examine the influence of environmental factors in chronic disease.

From 1979 to the present day, researchers from Cardiff University followed the lifestyle habits of men aged 45-59 living in the Caerphilly area.

They found that those who followed four or five of the specified healthy steps were 60 per cent less likely to develop dementia.

Noel Fowler, 91, stuck the course for 35 years.  A group of men from Caerphilly in South Wales celebrated completing a pioneering 35-year health study - beating killer diseases by making simple changes to their lifestyle. More than 2,500 men agreed to be monitored for the rest of their life - but only 25 of them managed to stick to the rules they were given in 1979- eat well, work out, drink less, keep their weight down and never smoke.Pictured here is Noel Fowler age 91 on the right with his brothers during his rugby playing days© WALES NEWS SERVICE

Noel Fowler, 91, stayed the course for 35 years. Right, with his brother during his rugby-playing days (right)

Putting the gloss on life: Graham Moore still paints and decorates at the age of 80

Putting the gloss on life: Graham Moore still paints and decorates at the age of 80

Reaping the benefits: Mr Moore in his younger days. He was among 2,500 volunteers who took part in the study

Reaping the benefits: Mr Moore in his younger days. He was among 2,500 volunteers who took part in the study

There was a similar reduction in the risk of heart attacks and strokes, along with 40 per cent fewer cancers.

There was also a 70 per cent cut in the risk of diabetes, according to evidence presented yesterday at a Healthy Ageing summit run by the university.

Retired teacher Leighton Jones and former warehouse cashier Ray Grace are both in rude good health after following the healthy guide lines laid down to them by the University scientists.

Keen cyclist Mr Jones, 80, rides 35 miles a week around the hills and valleys near his home and walks up to two miles every other day.

His wife Dorothy, 79, makes sure they eat fresh food and they keep their minds active by playing scrabble every evening at their Caerphilly home.

Still swinging: Donald Munn enjoying a game of golf at the age of 80 after steering clear of life's vices

Still swinging: Donald Munn enjoying a game of golf at the age of 80 after steering clear of life’s vices

Fit and healthy: Mr Munn pictured a few years ago during the study, which started way back in 1979

Fit and healthy: Mr Munn pictured a few years ago during the study, which started way back in 1979

Active: Pictured here is Bill Tudor  who still enjoys regular hiking at the grand old age of 86

Active: Pictured here is Bill Tudor who still enjoys regular hiking at the grand old age of 86

Bill Tudor back in the day: Every five years the men were re-questioned and re-examined along with their medical records to identify new cases of diabetes, heart disease and strokes

Bill Tudor back in the day: Every five years the men were re-questioned and re-examined along with their medical records to identify new cases of diabetes, heart disease and strokes

Granddad Mr Jones said: ‘I have followed the healthy steps for many years now and feel pretty fit. Cycling keeps my body fit while scrabble keep the mind fit.

‘I do have a beer or wine most nights but I drink in moderation.’

Bachelor Mr Grace, 80, travels all over Wales and the West Country refereeing college American football matches and walks and jogs two miles every day near his home in the village of Llanbradach.

And Mr Grace, a member of the British and American Football Referees Association, has no intention of retiring from the sport he loves.

He said: ‘I’ll go on as long as I am able to. I’ve been refereeing for nearly 30 years now and still get a thrill out of it.’

Ray Grace, a member of the British and American Football Referees Association, has no intention of retiring from the sport he loves

Ray Grace, a member of the British and American Football Referees Association, has no intention of retiring from the sport he loves

Mr Grace said: 'I'll go on as long as I am able to. I've been refereeing for nearly 30 years now and still get a thrill out of it'

Mr Grace said: ‘I’ll go on as long as I am able to. I’ve been refereeing for nearly 30 years now and still get a thrill out of it’

Mr Grace said he was happy to co-operate with researchers throughout the life of the project saying: ‘As far as I’m concerned it’s been a great success.

‘It has been invaluable for me and I’m pleased to have been part of it.

‘I’ve stuck pretty well to the healthy lifestyle laid down and met with the researchers half a dozen times over the years.

‘It has been invaluable for me and I’m pleased to have been part of it.’

The volunteers gave researchers regular reports of their physical activity, alcohol consumption, and diet.

Their wives and families helped by completing a food frequency questionnaire.

The recommended physical activity was to walk two or more miles to work each day, cycle 10 or more miles to work each day, or regular ‘vigorous’ exercise.

Glyn Prosser, age 77, who crafts walking sticks. The Caerphilly participants come from a community where consumption of fruit and vegetables was low

Glyn Prosser, age 77, who crafts walking sticks. The Caerphilly participants come from a community where consumption of fruit and vegetables was low

Clean living: Mr Prosser with his family in his earlier days while taking part in the study

Clean living: Mr Prosser with his family in his earlier days while taking part in the study

Green-fingered: Bert Maybury is still a keen gardener at the ripe old age of 85

Green-fingered: Bert Maybury is still a keen gardener at the ripe old age of 85

Mr Maybury pictured abseiling in his younger days. The Caerphilly research was a pilot for the much larger UK BIOBANK study involving more than 500,000 Britons

Mr Maybury pictured abseiling in his younger days. The Caerphilly research was a pilot for the much larger UK BIOBANK study involving more than 500,000 Britons

Study leader Peter Elwood, age 84

Study leader Peter Elwood, age 84

Every five years the men were re-questioned and re-examined along with their medical records to identify new cases of diabetes, heart disease and strokes. 

Professor Peter Elwood, who has led the School of Medicine study since its inception, said the findings were a ‘wake-up’ call.

‘Thirty years ago, only 30 men in our study followed all five of our recommended healthy steps,’ he said.

‘Although following these steps does not give them complete protection against disease, the men who, despite living healthily, developed a disease did so at a much older age than the men neglectful of their lifestyle.

‘Thus the development of heart disease was delayed by up to six years and it was up to around an additional 12 years before dementia took its grip.

‘On the less rosy end of the spectrum, 40 men in every 100 lived a life so neglectful that by any definition their lifestyle was unhealthy. They experienced none of the reductions in disease.’

Professor Elwood added: ‘The appalling fact is that recent surveys across the whole of Wales yield almost identical proportions of men and women following the healthy and unhealthy lifestyles found in Caerphilly 35 years ago. 

‘And the picture isn’t much better in England: 53 per cent of men drink more than the recommended amount and only half of men meet the government-recommended scores for well-being.’

The advice given by the project has become familiar from other research showing that staying slim, eating lots of fruit and vegetables, exercising regularly, drinking in moderation and never smoking boosts longevity.

The Caerphilly participants come from a community where consumption of fruit and vegetables was low, so three or more portions a day was accepted as ‘healthy’. Fat making up less than 30 per cent of calories was classed as a good diet.

Those regarded as physically active were walking two or more miles or cycling ten or more to work each day, or taking ‘vigorous’ exercise regularly.

Low alcohol consumption was defined as three or fewer units per day, with abstinence not treated as healthy behaviour.

Clare Walton, of the Alzheimer’s Society which part-funded the project, said: ‘These studies are expensive and complicated but essential to understand how dementia can be prevented.’

The Caerphilly research was a pilot for the much larger UK BIOBANK study involving more than 500,000 Britons. This is led by Professor John Gallacher, who also works at Cardiff.

 


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Article source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2815107/Living-healthy-lifestyle-delay-dementia-12-years.html