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5 Ways to Avoid a Food Coma on Thanksgiving

Do you remember how you felt last year after you finished eating your big Thanksgiving meal? Did you want to curl up in a ball, lie on the sofa, and fall asleep? Or did you want to go for a walk, play games with your family, and watch some turkey-day football?

Many of us have experienced the food coma — the feeling of being so full we can barely leave our chair. While turkey often gets the blame for post-Thanksgiving drowsiness, Scientific American says the biggest culprits are actually just overeating in general and consuming excess sugar from dessert (to learn the science behind why that sweet potato pie will make you sleepy read here).

The solution to avoiding a food coma is quite simple: stop eating before you’re completely stuffed and take it easy on the dessert. But on a holiday that’s largely focused around eating pumpkin pie, turkey and mashed potatoes, that’s easier said than done — so here are a few helpful tricks to make it work.

Skipping dessert may be the best thing to do to avoid a food coma.

Skipping dessert may be the best thing to do to avoid a food coma.

1. Before the big meal starts give yourself a pep-talk. Remind yourself that you want to feel happy and healthy at the end of the night and that you have the power to make that goal come true. If you are watching football when they show the recording of the coaches giving their pep-talk imagine they are talking to you about eating healthy.

2. Work with a buddy. Ask your sister, brother, mom, dad, friend, or cousin if they would like to be your accountability partner for the big day. Staying healthy with somebody else is much easier than doing it alone.

3. Everything in moderation unless you know something is your weakness. There is no reason you can’t have that sweet potato biscuit unless you know that after you have one you will need to eat twelve more. There are so many food choices on Thanksgiving that not having the one thing that is your weakness won’t seem like a big deal.

4. Serve the meal buffet style and don’t go up for seconds. When meals are served buffet style it’s much easier to say no to just having a little more of those mashed potatoes that you love. Know before you go up that you are only going to eat what you put on that plate the first time through the line. Remind yourself that you can always have turkey and gravy for breakfast, lunch, and dinner the next day.

5. Help with the cooking. It’s easier to make healthier food choices when you know exactly what goes into the food you are eating. If you see Grandma sneaking some high fructose corn syrup into her pie or Mom putting lard in her cookies you will already know you don’t want to pile those high on your plate.

I hope you have a wonderful and healthy Thanksgiving!

Image credit: inafrenzy via Flickr

Article source: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/5-ways-to-avoid-a-food-coma-on-thanksgiving.html

Healthy Living: Holidays Are Tough on Those Recovering from Addictions

The holidays can be pretty stressful for anyone but they’re often even more challenging for those recovering from addictions.

“I started experimenting with drugs when I was 13, very heavily by the time I got to high school a year later. I forgot everything I know. It took over, became the insidious disease that it is and I allowed it and field it. And I thought I loved it,” said Maj. John Stewart III, a Salvation Army Pastor.

In his 23 years of addiction, for Major John Stewart the third, the holidays were just another day.

“You just try to get high. That’s all. Everyday is the same. Everyday is the same. And you miss the holidays and you don’t admit it. But deep down you’re missing it, you’re missing the love and the connection, so you bury yourself in your addiction,” said Stewart.

In 1990, Stewart walked into a New England Salvation Army and checked himself in to the year-long inpatient recovery program.

“The only requirement was the desire to get better, which I really did have at first. I thought I was playing a game and was going to back out there and start all over again. But when I was there, God had other plans for me. I know that my upbringing and the church is what really helped me. I had been to other rehabs and I had good jobs and it didn’t click. But with the Salvation Army and the holistic aspect, mind, body and soul, because we have the philosophy that no one’s going to listen to you about a new life if you’re hungry, if you’re homeless, so they meet those needs while you’re there. And the best part about it, is it didn’t cost anything,” said Stewart.

Stewart has been sober for 23 years. And he’s now a Salvation Army pastor, ministering to those whose shoes he knows all too well. It’s particularly tough for them during the holiday season.

“It’s devastating. When you get past the part of being the tough guy or the tough lady and you don’t care, and you really think about it and it’s very lonely,” said Stewart.

Tracy Torelli, a St. Joseph’s Hospital Adult Outpatient Clinician said, “Because you have the opportunity to meet with so many people, even distant relatives, there’s a lot of opportunity for the person to feel maybe ashamed, maybe guilty. There’s a lot of opportunity for the family to go back on their old behaviors too of not functioning very well.”

Experts say it’s important to learn what triggers you into wanting to fall back into your own ways and learn the best ways to deal with them, whether it’s mediating, exercising, or talking to a sponsor.

For the full story and many more holiday health tips, check out our Half Hour Healthy Living Special

Article source: http://buffalo.twcnews.com/content/lifestyles/786658/healthy-living--holidays-are-tough-on-those-recovering-from-addictions/

Holidays Are Tough on Those Recovering from Addictions

The holidays can be pretty stressful for anyone but they’re often even more challenging for those recovering from addictions.

“I started experimenting with drugs when I was 13, very heavily by the time I got to high school a year later. I forgot everything I know. It took over, became the insidious disease that it is and I allowed it and field it. And I thought I loved it,” said Maj. John Stewart III, a Salvation Army Pastor.

In his 23 years of addiction, for Major John Stewart the third, the holidays were just another day.

“You just try to get high. That’s all. Everyday is the same. Everyday is the same. And you miss the holidays and you don’t admit it. But deep down you’re missing it, you’re missing the love and the connection, so you bury yourself in your addiction,” said Stewart.

In 1990, Stewart walked into a New England Salvation Army and checked himself in to the year-long inpatient recovery program.

“The only requirement was the desire to get better, which I really did have at first. I thought I was playing a game and was going to back out there and start all over again. But when I was there, God had other plans for me. I know that my upbringing and the church is what really helped me. I had been to other rehabs and I had good jobs and it didn’t click. But with the Salvation Army and the holistic aspect, mind, body and soul, because we have the philosophy that no one’s going to listen to you about a new life if you’re hungry, if you’re homeless, so they meet those needs while you’re there. And the best part about it, is it didn’t cost anything,” said Stewart.

Stewart has been sober for 23 years. And he’s now a Salvation Army pastor, ministering to those whose shoes he knows all too well. It’s particularly tough for them during the holiday season.

“It’s devastating. When you get past the part of being the tough guy or the tough lady and you don’t care, and you really think about it and it’s very lonely,” said Stewart.

Tracy Torelli, a St. Joseph’s Hospital Adult Outpatient Clinician said, “Because you have the opportunity to meet with so many people, even distant relatives, there’s a lot of opportunity for the person to feel maybe ashamed, maybe guilty. There’s a lot of opportunity for the family to go back on their old behaviors too of not functioning very well.”

Experts say it’s important to learn what triggers you into wanting to fall back into your own ways and learn the best ways to deal with them, whether it’s mediating, exercising, or talking to a sponsor.

For the full story and many more holiday health tips, check out our Half Hour Healthy Living Special

Article source: http://rochester.twcnews.com/content/lifestyles/786658/healthy-living--holidays-are-tough-on-those-recovering-from-addictions/

Burger King opens in Mumbai — tips for weight watchers to choose healthy options

Article source: http://www.thehealthsite.com/news/burger-king-opens-in-mumbai-tips-for-weight-watchers-to-choose-healthy-options/

Tips for keeping your heart healthy!

Irengbam Jenny

A healthy heart is the way to healthy living, they say. Quite right! But with sedentary lifestyle, munching on junk food, alcohol consumption, smoking, erratic working hours and unwanted stress ultimately leads to a troubled heart, so to say.

Here are some tips for a healthy heart:

Quit smoking: Quitting smoking is the most important thing that a person can do to live longer. A smoker is more likely to have a heart attack than a non-smoker. The risk of heart attack reduces once you stop smoking, several studies suggest.

Less salt: Consumption of salt should be cut down as it causes high-blood pressure and increases the risk of developing coronary heart disease. Foods items such as chips, salted nuts, canned eatables, packet soups, sauces and ready meals should be avoided. Even breakfast cereals and bread that looks healthy, contains high level of salt.

Healthy diet: A healthy diet is very important to reduce the risk of developing heart disease. It also helps to increase the chances of survival after heart attack. One should include plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, oily fish and starchy foods in their balanced diet to have a healthy heart. Foods like biscuits, cakes, pastries and dairy products to be avoided as they contain high amount of saturated fats and sugar.

Reduce alcohol: Drinking too much of alcohol is not good for health otherwise as well, and can damage the heart muscle. It also increases the blood pressure and leads to weight gain. One should limit the intake of alcohol, as binge drinking increases the risk of having an untimely sudden attack.

Stay active: One should be physically active in order to keep a healthy heart. As heart is a muscle, it needs exercise to remain fit so that it can pump blood efficiently round the body with each heart beat. One should exercise at least for 30 minutes in a day. Staying physically fit benefits your mental health and well-being too.

Maintain weight: Being overweight or obese can affect the health functioning, leading to the risk of coronary heart disease and diabetes. If you are overweight one should maintain weight in order to reduce the risk of heart disease.

Regular check-up: One should regularly check their blood pressure and cholesterol levels. A person who has a high blood pressure falls under a higher risk of having an attack. The life expectancy gets shorter if you have a high blood pressure. The high levels of cholesterol in the blood leads to fatty deposits in the coronary arteries that increases the risk of coronary heart disease.

Manage stress level: Taking too much stress is not good for health, and everyone is aware of it. People who are the most stressed are more likely to have a heart attack. If you find things are getting on top of you, take a break in between and relax. Managing your high stress levels is the best way to keep your heart in healthy and thumping in the right manner.

 

 

Article source: http://zeenews.india.com/news/health/health-news/tips-for-keeping-your-heart-healthy_1503016.html

5 Healthly Living Tips Almost Every Health Expert Agrees On

Nutrition is a complex issue, especially if you’re trying to decide whether you should make the transition to a 100 percent plant-based diet or not. With so many factors to consider, making choices for our health can seem daunting at times. Don’t let this stray you from the decision to choose healthy foods and lifestyle practices daily though. Taking care of yourself by eating healthy is a benefit you’ll reap rewards from today and years to come. But you already know that, and many of you are probably wondering, what’s the best way to eat?

Health experts can be a wonderful go-to source when it comes to learning about nutrition, but the confusing part of this puzzle happens when different health experts advise us to do different things. Some advocate a vegan diet, while others don’t. There are also many diets out there, all telling us to do different things to take care of ourselves properly. So, who’s right?

No matter what type of health expert (such as a doctor or dietitian) you turn to, most all of them will agree on five simple principles. These will take you on the road to success and set you up for taking care of yourself each day without the need for much concern over who’s right and wrong. The advice might not be rocket science, but are common sense approaches that we often tend to forget in the midst of busy lives and dieting “noise” we hear about.

Here’s five tickets to good health:

1. Eat Real Food

No health expert out there (except ones selling dieting products) will tell you that a processed food is superior to an unprocessed food. That’s something you can bet on. Real food, such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, legumes, nuts, and seeds will provide you with phytonutrients your mind and body need. Simple, healthy foods. This advice becomes boring to many after awhile, but the beauty of eating true, beautiful plants is something that everyone can experience daily if they choose to. These foods are made of nutrients our body can easily recognize and put to use immediately to take care of us. Other foods that have been more processed, are much harder on our bodies to metabolize, which often makes us tired, sluggish, suffer inflammation and disease, and even gain weight. Dr. Mark Hyman, medical doctor and functional medicine expert, advises everyone eat eight to 12 servings of fresh vegetables, fruits, beans, nuts, seeds, and whole grains every single day. Filling up your diet with these foods leaves less room for the not-so-beneficial foods (we’re looking at you McDonald’s and Twinkies!)

2. Avoid Too Much Processed Sugar

Processed sugar are added sugars that have been refined or altered in some fashion or another. They also aren’t whole foods. Fruits, starchy vegetables, and whole grains should make up your carbohydrate intake, not syrups and powders that are full of glycemic-spiking sugar that lead to diabetes and heart disease. If you’re eating real, whole foods, this step comes naturally. Craving candy? Reach for an apple or pear. Their sugars will digest much more slowly into your bloodstream, thanks to all the amazing fiber they contain. Craving a sugary, warm donut? Have a baked sweet potato or hot bowl of oatmeal instead. Sugar has no nutrients and even syrups that contain some nutrients don’t have fiber like whole, plant-based foods. This means they’ll spike your blood sugar more quickly and won’t satisfy your hunger. Harvard Health even says that sugar can lead to death. How’s that for those sweet tooth cravings?!

3. Choose Plants First

If you’re 100 percent vegan, that’s great! However, how many plants are you eating? If you’re not 100 percent vegan, how many plants are you eating daily? See, the thing is, even vegans may not be getting enough fruits and veggies daily. Tons of vegan foods exist in the grocery stores today, but that doesn’t mean that we should be basing our diets off of them. And while we can’t live off fruits and veggies alone, we can live off a diet full of plants (beans, nuts, seeds, whole grains, and yes – the fruits and veggies too.) If you’re transitioning into, or interested in, a plant-based diet, then follow the same suit. Always choose plants first. No matter what meal you eat, fill it up with as many plant-based foods as possible. All health experts will tell you this is a smart choice. Dr. Alona Pulde and Dr. Matthew Lederman from the Forks Over Knives website, also advise you avoid processed foods whenever possible, even if they’re vegan. Learn some tips for how to transition to a vegan diet if you’re embracing the idea to do so.

4. Eat Enough Calories

While most people want to know how to cut calories, getting enough calories is incredibly important to your health. Not getting enough will make you tired, fatigued, and even anxious or depressed. While you needn’t count calories daily, you should be sure you’re eating at least three meals a day and snacks if you need them. Eating 100 percent plant-based from real whole foods, already means you’re taking in less calories than a diet filled with processed and fatty, sugary fast food or animal foods. Plants are largely water and fiber by weight, not rich in very many dense calories. This means you’ll need to be sure you’re eating enough daily so your metabolism doesn’t suffer. In a vegan diet, starches, beans and legumes, nuts, and seeds will provide more dense calories than fruits and veggies will, so don’t leave them out! Dr. Reed Mangels, R.D. advises that we eat protein rich foods like whole grains, beans, legumes, nuts, leafy greens, and seeds for this purpose.

5. Get Enough Rest

Your body needs sleep just as much as it needs food. For whatever reasons, due to your work life or your home life, it can be difficult to get enough sleep on a regular basis. But all health experts will agree, this is an incredibly important piece of the puzzle. Don’t leave it out! Getting 7-8 hours of sleep each night will help you think more clearly the next day, improve your metabolism, and will even protect you from disease. Dr. Michael Breus, also known as The Sleep Doctor, also shares that insomnia and lack of sleep has been directly related to depression. Just so you know, eating a plant-based diet will already improve your sleep and likely help you wake up more energized. All that from some fresh, natural foods? Sign us up!

You should also be sure you’re exercising daily, or at least being active. Our bodies need to be worked and our digestive system and hearts require movement daily to function at their best. Exercising also boosts brain health and can help prevent depression, disease, insomnia, treat anxiety, and improve mental performance.

So, as you can see, while no one expert may eat the same (nor do any of us), they all advise simple health principles that can be easy to forget everyday. Don’t leave these tips out- they just might make the difference in your entire life.

Image Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr

This content provided above is for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

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Article source: http://www.onegreenplanet.org/natural-health/healthly-living-tips-almost-every-health-expert-agrees-on/

West Kittanning health center could reopen after Pa. Supreme Court ruling – Tribune

The shuttered state Department of Health office in West Kittanning might reopen in the wake of a Pennsylvania Supreme Court decision Thursday.

The court sided with a union that represents nurses and put a halt to plans by Gov. Tom Corbett’s administration to close more than a third of the state’s county-based health centers.

The court ordered the administration to stop eliminating the centers, reopen those that have been closed and restore the level of public health services to 1995 levels.

The Butler Road-based Department of Health office was one of 60 targeted for closure under Corbett’s plan. The office closed last year.

Armstrong County Commissioner Bob Bower said he was glad to hear Corbett’s decision was reversed and described the state health centers as an asset to county residents.

“The closures were detri-mental to the health and welfare of Armstrong County residents, so to hear the decision has been reversed is a rewarding feeling,� Bower said. “The centers are a good way for residents to stay on top of health-related issues in the county.�

The state health centers traditionally test for sexually transmitted diseases and tuberculosis, treat people with communicable diseases, provide immunizations such as flu shots and investigate food-borne illnesses, among other things.

The majority opinion, by Justice Max Baer, said the Legislature has never changed a mandate in a 1996 law that the state maintain the number of health centers it had as of July 1995, when it operated 60 of them.

“While the executive branch contends that its proposed modernization plan is more cost efficient and better serves the citizens of the commonwealth, it is not for this court to opine on that policy determination,� Baer wrote.

Corbett’s administration began to close 26 centers and reorganize public health services last year as a cost-saving budget move designed to increase efficiency.

Service Employees International Union Healthcare Pennsylvania Vice President Kevin Hefty said the state had closed some of the 26 — he wasn’t sure how many — and nurses were laid off or reassigned to other areas. He said it appears those nurse consultant positions will have to be restored.

“These centers provide valuable public health services to the community,â€� Hefty said. “They’re located in nearly every county in the commonwealth. And, by closing 26 of them, those counties did not have a place to go to get their public health questions answered.â€�

Health Department spokeswoman Aimee Tysarczyk said the decision was being reviewed “to determine the implications to the plan moving forward� and said officials will provide details to agency staff and the public once that review is finished.

In a lone dissent, Justice Michael Eakin said the 1996 law did not preclude closing centers, but rather required the same level of health services to be maintained.

“Times change, and it cannot be that the Legislature meant to lock the state into a series of locations in perpetuity,� Eakin wrote.

The SEIU, Department of Health nurses and several Democratic state lawmakers sued April 1, 2013, to keep the centers open.

With no timeline for when the center will open, Bower said he remains weary of the centers’ fate when they reopen.

“It was closed as a cost-saving measure, so I’m afraid those same measures may continue in the future,â€� Bower said. “We’re going to have to be vigilant and well-informed of what’s going on in Harrisburg when it comes to state health centers to make sure they’re not closed again.â€�

Stacy Wolford is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. She can be reached at 724-684-2640 or at swolford@tribweb.com. Brad Pedersen is a staff writer for Trib Total Media. He can be reached at 724-543-1303, ext. 1337, or bpedersen@tribweb.com. The Associated Press contributed.

Article source: http://triblive.com/news/armstrong/7211596-74/health-centers-state

Baker names Sudders as health and human services chief



Bill Brett for the Boston Globe/File

Marylou Sudders

Governor-elect Charlie Baker on Friday named a veteran mental health administrator and child protection advocate to lead the state’s sprawling health and human services secretariat.

Marylou Sudders, commissioner of the state Department of Mental Health from 1996 to 2003 before taking over as president of the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, most recently has led Boston College’s health and mental health graduate program.

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As head of the Executive Office of Health and Human Services, Sudders will lead a $19.4 billion agency, nearly three times the next largest in state government. Her agency will implement the Affordable Care Act and cope with the aftermath of several tragic deaths of children under the care of the Department of Children and Families.

Baker has now announced three Cabinet secretaries, all of whom, like his chief of staff selection, have state government experience.

Among them, Sudders, 60, who Baker’s transition team said is not enrolled in a political party, is perhaps the best-known figure on Beacon Hill. She has served in and around government for decades.


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“Having dedicated my professional life to social work, mental health, and caring for the most vulnerable members of our society, I am humbled and inspired to take on this role,” Sudders said in a statement distributed by Baker.

Baker aides said
Sudders was not available for an interview Friday.

Democratic Attorney General Martha Coakley, Baker’s election opponent, praised the pick.

“I have the utmost respect for Marylou Sudders, particularly her work to protect children and improve mental health care for all. I commend Governor-elect Baker for appointing Marylou,” Coakley said in a press release.

Maria Z. Mossaides, executive director of Cambridge Family and Children’s Service and the chairwoman of the Children’s League of Massachusetts, said Sudders has “very broad public policy experience,” describing her as a “fabulous, fabulous choice.”

Most recently, Sudders was one of eight specialists in a range of fields who were called upon by House Speaker Robert A. DeLeo to develop gun-control legislation, which passed into law in August.

Last summer, after Governor Deval Patrick reluctantly removed Olga Roche as the head of the embattled DCF, Patrick called on Sudders to serve as one of several advisers to the incoming DCF chief, Erin Deveney, a lawyer with no prior child welfare experience.

Now, DCF and other troubled agencies will be Sudders’ responsibility. SEIU Local 509 — the union that represents more than 17,000 human service workers in Massachusetts, including DCF employees — applauded Sudders’ selection, calling her “a mental health expert with whom we have a long history of collaboration.”

“Both as commissioner of the Department of Mental Health and executive director of the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Massachusetts providers have long worked with Marylou Sudders to improve services for some of the Commonwealth’s most vulnerable populations,” Local 509 president Susan Tousignant said in a statement.

Sudders will also oversee the state’s health care website, which failed last October, frustrating consumers and costing millions. And she will have to handle the advent of medical marijuana dispensaries, which have seen a rollout fraught with problems.

Judy Meredith, a veteran human services lobbyist who has worked with Sudders for years, said she is adept at diagnosing such problems and developing solutions.

“She’s honest, forthright, and doesn’t put the blame on everybody else,” Meredith said. “She’s smart and tactical and very convincing in her arguments to legislators.”

Sudders would become the first woman to receive a high-profile post in the Baker administration. He has named three men as his chief of staff, top housing and economic development aide, and energy and environmental affairs secretary.

His campaign policy chief, Elizabeth Mahoney, will also have a prominent role within the administration, Baker advisers say.

Sudders’ work in mental health dates to 1978, according to her online curriculum vitae. She sits on the state’s Health Policy Commission, a Coakley appointee.

She has taught at the Boston College Graduate School of Social Work since 2012.

Baker’s choice for the health and human services secretariat has been among his most closely watched selections.

A former health and human services chief himself, in the Weld administration, Baker during the campaign was outspoken in his criticism of Patrick’s handling of DCF.

During and after the campaign, Baker warned about the cost to taxpayers of implementing the Affordable Care Act.

Jim O’Sullivan can be reached at jim.osullivan@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter at @JOSreports.

Article source: http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2014/11/21/baker-poised-name-health-and-human-services-chief/i21Brkj7lia1wCzYWeUJcK/story.html

How to Arrive at the Best Health Policies

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Article source: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/23/upshot/how-to-arrive-at-the-best-health-policies-.html

7 Trends Driving Global Health And Life Sciences In 2015

There are presently massive shifts occurring in the competitive global landscape of health, and particularly in the life sciences. As we approach 2015, it is imperative that leaders in the health space understand the trends and shifts happening around them, not only in the US, but also in international markets, cities and service lines.

With unparalleled connectivity, evolving demographics, impressive growth in patent applications in emerging markets and pharmaceutical demand changes worldwide, there is no doubt that hospital leadership, policymakers, manufacturers, inventors and clinicians in America need to know what is in the pipeline for 2015 and beyond. Using the 2014 Global Life Sciences Cluster Report from JLL, here are the top 7 trends you need to know for success in 2015.

  1. Global Innovation: While both North America and Europe continue to have the most life science Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) applications per year (41% and 31% share, respectively), major shifts are occurring. PCT applications, an international measure of innovative output, in Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean are increasing, with the gap forecasted to continue closing. This trend, in part, can be attributed to the shift from broad, chronic disease biological maturity in developed countries to developing countries. In turn, many advanced cities and companies are transitioning to specific, personalized biologics and care. For example, biosimilars are taking root in the US and EU, while diabetes has become a primary focus of the Middle East and North Africa.cluster-graphic
  2. An Aging Workforce And Population: Between 1993 and 2010, the percentage of the scientific and engineering workforce over the age of 50 increased from 20% to 33%. Further, before 2020 it is estimated that 2 million engineering and life science jobs will become open, mostly due to retirement. Per the 2014 ManpowerGroup’s annual global survey of 38,000 employers in 42 countries, 35% of employers report difficulty in filling jobs. Of those, 54% report this difficulty in filling jobs has a direct impact on their ability to meet client needs. For example, in China, the one-child policy has made the current health care workforce unable to manage its aging population, a problem Intel is hoping to solve. With the aging of America’s workforce compared to youth in developing countries, Harvard Business Review contributors have suggested “retiring retirement” in the US. Flexible work hours, new technology, new training programs and varied skill sets are going to cause major shifts in corporate America, especially within the health ecosystem in areas such as pharma and medical device. While STEM (science, tech, engineering and math) programs targeting women have become increasingly popular in the US, females are still greatly under-represented in this area (only 23% of the engineering workforce in 2008), and could possibly help meet health and tech demands.
  3. Regulation And Taxation: Not surprisingly, Japan and the United States have the highest corporate statutory tax burdens (39.5% and 39.1%, respectively). While many argue this drives down innovation, others claim it merely keeps companies from having investments in the US. For example, Medtronic recently committed to purchasing Covidien, with speculation that the move is to keep funds in Ireland, with its low tax rate. However, the US and Japan also have some of the best regulatory systems and high political and transparency rates in the world, making production and sales easier for many. And, according to Roger Humphrey, Executive Director of JLL’s Life Sciences group, “Federal policy, such as corporate tax structures and regulatory frameworks, directly impacts life sciences companies’ ability to establish roots and flourish over time.”Corporate Tax Rates
  4. Education: The highest percentage of the working population (25-64 years old) with bachelor’s-type degrees still belongs to the United States. However, that can no longer be said for younger generations. For example, the percentage of 25-34-year-olds with bachelor’s degree is higher in Korea (39%), The Netherlands (38%), the United Kingdom (38%) and Australia (34%) than in the US (33%). According to the OECD 2011 Report, “Because of the rapid expansion of tertiary education both in the industrialized world and in emerging economies, the US is fast losing its advantage.”
  5. RD Funding And Concentration: Presently, 10 countries account for 80% of global RD. Because businesses are the biggest source of RD funds, investor confidence and broader economies can have major impacts on funds appropriated for both research and development. However, The Burrill Report claims confidence in biotech seems to have returned, with 2013 being a banner year for life science IPO activity in the US with 52 deals resulting in $7 billion, compared to $1 billion for 16 deals in 2012. However, on a country-level, by the early 2020’s, China’s RD spending could surpass that of the US.
  6. Declining Barriers For Entrepreneurs:Barriers to entry in entrepreneurship have declined in most countries, especially among the more developed global cities. This is in contrast to the emerging life sciences clusters. Mr. Humphrey notes, “We are consistently seeing that the countries with the lowest barriers to entrepreneurship are the UK and The Netherlands, while China and India presently have the highest barriers to entry.” He claims this is due to difficulties with collaboration and the shared risk models in these emerging markets.
  7. Differences In Labor Productivity: Between 2003 and 2012, there was a 5% increase in the labor productivity in developing countries, compared to a 1% increase in labor productivity in developed countries. This measure indicates how many goods and services are produced in one hour of labor, and therefore, a continued trend (tracked since 2007) consistently shows that year-over-year shifts in labor productivity are benefiting developing countries. As wealth grows, so too does opportunities to produce specialization and cost-effective output.Changes in labor productivity

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Article source: http://www.forbes.com/sites/nicolefisher/2014/11/21/7-trends-driving-global-health-and-life-science-in-2015/